Get Ready For Some Mouth Watering Appetizer At Hong Kong!!

Post by Sayantika Mukherji | May 18, 2017

Hong Kong has always been the place for food lovers and all the foods you get are extremely delecious. There is very interesting amalgamation of cuisines. Hong Kong cuisine is mainly influenced by Canotenese and other western cuisines. Non-Cantonese Chinese cuisine.  Japan, and Southeast Asia, due to Hong Kong's past as a British colony and long history of being an international port of commerce. From the roadside stalls to the most upscale restaurants, Hong Kong provides an unlimited variety of food in every class. Complex combinations and international gourmet expertise have given Hong Kong the reputable labels of "Gourmet Paradise" and "World's Fair of Food" Most East Asian cuisines, with the exception of fusion and thai, are consumed exclusively with chopsticks. The more Western style cuisines favour cutlery. Some meals are more suited for the use of hands. One notable trend in restaurants is the limited number of napkins provided during a meal. Most mid to low-tier restaurants operate under the assumption that customers bring their own napkins or tissue packs when dining. Hong Kong-style Chinese pastry offers a plethora of choices for the discerning taster.Depending on location, some shops may carry a wider selection than others, and some may bake goods on the premise while others have it delivered from an off-site bakery.Have you ever wondered where the locals in Hong Kong go out to eat? From fancy fine dining to humble street food, these 10 delicious places always keep Hongkongers satisfied and coming back for more!

 

Let's check out the places of Hong Kong:

Tim Ho Wan:

Opened by chef Mak Kwai Pui, previously dim sum chef at three-Michelin-star restaurant Lung King Hin, this casual eatery serves delectable morsels of traditional dim sum, including the four heavenly kings: pork buns, rice noodles, turnip cake and steamed egg cake. Be prepared to line up early, they don’t accept reservations. Meals are relatively quick as the menu is small (about 30 items). With a few branches already opened in Hong Kong and a recent expansion to Singapore, get your grub while it’s hot.

Tsui Wah:

Opened by chef Mak Kwai Pui, previously dim sum chef at three-Michelin-star restaurant Lung King Hin, this casual eatery serves delectable morsels of traditional dim sum, including the four heavenly kings: pork buns, rice noodles, turnip cake and steamed egg cake. Be prepared to line up early, they don’t accept reservations. Meals are relatively quick as the menu is small (about 30 items). With a few branches already opened in Hong Kong and a recent expansion to Singapore, get your grub while it’s hot.

Mak's Noodles:

Wonton noodles, like fried rice, are not a strange food concept to most global citizens. Basically, this entails shrimp wrapped in a delicate ravioli pocket, served with chewy egg noodles in a salty fish broth. But rarely will you get the chance to slurp up a bowl as authentic as the version served at Mak’s.Even in Hong Kong, this sort of standard – hand-made noodle served with intense fish broth untainted by flavor enhancer MSG – is fast dying. And the kale served here – a typical side dish to go with the noodles – is consistently, unbeatably tender. If it’s good enough for Anthony Bourdain – Mak’s most famous advocate – and good enough for the locals.

Maxim's Palace City Hall:

In a rather garish décor featuring faux grand chandeliers and tired carpets, forever grumpy attendants barking incomprehensibly are haphazardly pushing carts full of steamed delicacies like ‘har gow’, ‘siu mai’ and ‘chaar siu bau’. Meanwhile large groups of raucous patrons shout their orders across a cramped dining room the size of a small stadium. There might be plenty of better dim sum options across Hong Kong, but none can provide the range of truly local experiences like Maxim’s does. Waiting in line? Check! Noise? Check! Indifferent service? Check! Good food? Check!

Keep Enjoying Your Appetite at Hong Kong!!